Signs


As I was reading through the text of the book of Exodus this summer, I noticed something regarding the two signs, which the LORD gave to Moses. Those two signs were aiming, not only, at mere confirmation of the truthfulness of the message (Exod 4:1-9), but also were to witness קוֹל a message to the hearers.

The usage of קוֹל (sound/voice), and the verb שׁמע (listen) in the phrase יִשְׁמְע֔וּ לְקֹ֖ל הָאֹ֣ת (Exod 4:8) translated by the NET Bible, “pay attention to the … sign” does not point to the meaning of the sign, but rather denotes  “the voice”, the “noise” it causes. As if the signs cry loud to the people, “this is supernatural, this is divine, and you got to believe.”

Therefore, these signs were to accompany Moses’ words, in order to witness to the divine origin of the salvation he proclaims. The Signs were a voice, a trumpet that this Salvation is both true and divine.

In fact, this pattern is similar to Jesus’ proclamation of salvation (John 10: 36-38). A proclamation that was accompanied by marvelous signs to witness to the Divinity of Jesus and the truthfulness and seriousness of His Salvation. Of course I need to do further study to confirm/refute this interpretation. Nonetheless, I thought it is worth sharing so far.

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Read the Word


“We have done almost everything that is possible with these Hebrew and Greek writings. We  have overlaid them, clause by clause, with exhaustive commentaries; we have translated them,  revised the translations, and quarreled over the revisions.… There is yet one thing left to do  with the Bible: simply to read it.”

Richard G. Moulton, A Short Introduction to the Literature of the Bible (Boston: D.C. Heath, 1901)

As I Grow


As I grow in my walk with the Lord, I learn to thank Him for things that I used to complain about, also for things I used to fear from. He is the Creator and Savior; therefore, He knows everything and everyone. Surely His wisdom greatly exceeds my understanding, and His love would overcome my fears.

The Brilliance of the Gospel: an excerpt from Everyday Apologetics, by Travis Dickinson


Before we move on, I must confess that even thought I have been thinking about these truths for decades, I still find myself in awe. I’m a philosopher trained at a high level of analytic philosophy. I have read many of the greatest minds who have ever lived, and in my opinion , there ‘s nothing quite like the Gospel. I still find my self hearing this afresh and am forced to pause in wonder at the beauty and brilliance of the Gospel. I find it simply the most amazing and breathtaking series of thoughts, ever offered.

Travis Dickinson, Everyday Apologetics

Love 101


The Christian love is shaped by the biblical concept of sacrifice. God the Father showed us His love in the incarnational and sacrificial work of His Son (Jn 3:16). Moreover, love is given to Christians by the dwelling of His Spirit in them when they believed (Rom 5:5). Therefore, true Christian love is not about satisfying the self, nor it is mere emotionalism.

Loving our enemies for instance, does not necessary involve having affections towards those who persecute us ( the context of Luke 6 for instance;  the early followers of Jesus anticipated persecution). Nor does biblical love mean to pretend to have passion towards those who embrace sin and impose it on others (  think of all kinds of sin, may be this is a sort of hypocrisy). In our endeavors to win sinners to Christ, we should be cautious not to be no different from them. The downward spiral in the name of love is an easy way to go.

Rather to love our enemies involves caring for them and their souls,  being able to serve them and to work for their true interest, despite our own feelings (Luke 6:27).  In short,  biblical Christians should not buy into the world’s perception of love, because  we disagree with the world on the meaning, source, and the end of love. If we believe in the Bible authority, we should make it the fountain of our perspectives.

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Devotion Psalm 93


There is an undeniable connection  between the dwelling place of the LORD and the presence of holiness,  between God’s reign and submission to His commandments. God forgives sin when its proper price is paid, by the shed of innocent blood as a sacrifice;  by the death of Christ the Savior. Nonetheless, sin is never tolerated by our Holy LORD, regardless of  what the world thinks. The reign of the LORD is a rule of holiness.

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